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Archive for Centennial Review

Defending Choice

trash-service-web

To read the article this cartoon is illustrating, go here.

http://www.ccu.edu/centennial/review/september-2015/

The Supreme Court has ruled that homosexual marriage is the law of the land, based upon the belief that gay marriage is somehow a due process right. Marriage itself, perhaps, maybe, but as originally defined. This had nothing to do with denying anybody the right to marriage, but rather whether or not individual states could define what it looks like. Perhaps changing the definition to include same sex partners makes sense from a secular humanist worldview, but the problem is, last poll I checked, approximately 60% of Americans still identified themselves as Christian.

This ruling created a very sticky situation for many Christians who hold strong beliefs about sexual purity. How much of the power of the State is going to try and interfere with those beliefs and do Christians have protections to live and conduct their lives around those beliefs? As the Kim Davis situation has demonstrated, apparently, Christians are to conform or else….

When the cake lady first made the news, I thought, well, heck, only an extreme leftist kook would think it is okay to deny religious freedom to a sole proprietor. Getting into the mix of the debate, boy, was I sure wrong. The number of people who assumed that once you run a business you no longer have religious freedoms was shocking. So what are those protections for then? The closed door of one’s private home? To some, yes.

The reasons were broad, and the misconceptions were many. Because I feel like the ease at which people were willing to castigate the Christian business owners was so great, and because of the dangerous precedent this creates, I really feel like I need to address each debating point brought up. The LGBT movement has done a great job labeling any spoken word that isn’t lock step with their agenda as being hate-speech, thereby shutting it down. But, what is more hateful? Destroying the livelihood of a fledgling mom and pop business, bringing upon the couple poverty and ruin, simply because they wouldn’t do what their competitors down the street were happy to do? Or talking about such issues?

 

Christians do not have the right to force their views on others.

This is the first and most common objection. And I absolutely agree with them. Problem is, the Christian photographer did not go and seek out the gay couple and tell them they couldn’t get married. I would take issue with that. Rather, the gay couple came to her and told her, “by force of law, you have to photograph our wedding.” Excuse me, but who’s forcing who in this situation? Who is getting their freedom denied? The gay couple can simply pick up the phone and find another photographer. And if you know anything about the photography industry, you’ll know that 99% of photographers embrace homosexual marriage. The issue has never been about lack of accommodation.

In some cases, such as with the baker, the business owner even offered an alternative, a friend who would do exactly what the gay couple wanted. They were in essence saying, “I cannot do this because it would violate my beliefs, but I don’t want to deny you the right to these services, so here is the number of my friend.” By still pursuing the lawsuit, the gay couple in essence responded with, “You are not allowed to have those beliefs. We’ll do what we can to change them.” Who is being more tolerant here?

 

The 1964 Public Accommodation Act forbids Christians from denying service to anybody.

Boy, have I heard this one, and boy is it being misapplied in this situation. The problem is, using this objection is trying to paint over this whole situation with a broad brush, refusing to acknowledge or recognize certain very clear distinctions. If the Christian baker said to the homosexual couple, “get out of my store, you are gay,” I would defend the gay couple. That’s not what happened. The baker mentioned that they made birthday cakes for the couple in the past. So clearly, they are not denying service to the gay couple. The distinction is whether or not an artisan or craftsman, like the bakers, can decide what kind of products they produce. Or whether the state has the right to dictate to them the object of their art.

The analogy I keep hearing is, “Well does that give an auto mechanic the right to turn down a gay couple because it’s his religious beliefs?” This argument is not even analogous. Of course, the auto mechanic has to serve the gay couple. If they are doing the same transmission work on the gay couple’s car as anybody else’s, then, yes, they have to serve them. I defer back to the birthday cake example. Now if the gay couple came to a car airbrusher and asked to have “Gay Pride” spray painted on the side in rainbow colors so they could drive their car during Pridefest, the airbrusher should have the right to say “no, this is not the type of product I wish to create.” And if I was that airbrusher, I would protect my butt by referring them to a friend who would. The issue isn’t that he doesn’t want to serve the gays, the issue is that he doesn’t want to support that message!

That’s a huge distinction that keeps getting lost. The examples are numerous. Should a printer be forced to print porn if they disagree with it? Should a restaurant owner be forced to cook meat, in order to “accommodate” all of us meat eaters? No! In all cases, even the most leftist would say, if you want meat, go to a restaurant that makes it.

The other giant hole in the accommodation argument is the fact that most of these people finding themselves in trouble are actually independent freelancers, without a storefront or retail space. To the photographer, the caterer, the musicians–they are literally saying come and BE IN our wedding, or else we will destroy you. This has nothing to do with accommodation on the part of these freelancers.

 

I would be happy to take on a Christian project, even though I’m not Christian, I don’t understand why you Christians can’t do the same.

This is usually the final retort I hear. And to it, I say, that’s great! That’s your choice. I wish to support your right to make money however you see fit, and if that means creating art and product that violates your core beliefs, more power to you. No doubt there are some Christians that would still bake that cake, even in spite of their beliefs. The point is, that is your CHOICE, and that’s what I am defending.

If you decided NOT to create a Christian product (say an illustrator turned down a job from Focus on the Family), I would support that choice as well. In the case of the pizza shop, GoFundMe shut down the  GoFundMe page that was set up to help the pizza business offset the costs of being targeted by a liberal reporter because the cause was in violation of their beliefs. GoFundMe refused their service to a Christian because of their beliefs! And these same LGBT people applauded GoFundMe for this courageous decision without even recognizing the sheer irony of it. Do I support GoFundMe’s right to do this? While I disagree with the decision, the answer is yes.

The judges who are siding with the LGBT movement in these cases are doing so for the purpose of advancing a personal agenda and without any amount of compassion for the Christians. It’s not enough for Christians to live and let live, as many have. They must change their thinking about homosexuality. If we cannot persuade them, then we will force them, by the power of the state. Lives ruined, First Amendment redefined… that’s what this cartoon is about.


PS, I’m not making any judgements on homosexuality, one way or the other, with this particular post, as I feel it would detract from the greater point that I’m trying to defend, and that is of freedom. I have many friends and some family who have chosen this lifestyle, and God bless them, I love them dearly and they are wonderful people. Sometimes defending freedom means defending people with whom we disagree.

Dick Morris Caricature

dick morris

I love Dick Morris. I don’t always agree with him, but that’s okay, I love that he is so animated by the power of his convictions, and right or wrong, he is willing to make bold predictions. But the one thing that separates him from so many others is that he takes ownership over the things he says, which takes real guts.

He ruffled a few feathers at the Summit when he stategized differently than Ted Cruz on a key issue. That’s okay, it’s the debate and discussion that’s important. Something conservatives welcome wholeheartedly.

 

Scott Walker Caricature

EPSON MFP image

Whether you agree with him or not, you have to admire the tremendous courage of Scott Walker. Most politicians would have caved after the vicious attacks he endured, all because he wanted to do the best for his state and bring in a little fiscal responsibility. Of course, that means putting some reins on the money train, but apparently that was enough to get out of state special interests to try and get him recalled… twice.

me and scott walker

I actually got to meet him. And I made him laugh. (always makes my day when I can get people to laugh, especially high ranking politicians.) I’m not all that crazy about the photo, however. The lighting’s weird and that glare in my glasses makes me look devious. I was having a bad hair day and my exhaustion is showing.

Because Walker wanted to avoid the appearance of all evil, he declined to take home the portrait, signing it instead (see the silver sharpee halfway down the image?), and putting it into the permanent collection of the Centennial Institute’s growing art museum collection.

KT McFarland Caricature

KT McFarland

So I don’t watch Fox News, and I didn’t really know who KT McFarland was when I started her caricature. All I had was a few photos to go by and in each, she had big hair. So naturally, I exaggerated. Then when I saw her in person, she had a whole new hairdo, and she looked much younger. Oh well, that’s why it’s a caricature and not a portrait, right?

Oh, and by the way, KT McFarland, besides being a commentator on foreign affairs, held national security posts under Nixon, Ford and Reagan.

 

Mia Love, the portrait

Mia Love, Mayor of Saratoga Springs

This is my portrait of Mia Love. Mia Love is currently mayor of her small town in Utah, but has her sights on the national stage, running for congress for her district in 2014. One of her first major appearances was at the Republican Convention of 2012.

I started on this piece first thing in the morning, so my creative energies were the most in tune, and it really comes across as evident in this piece. I painted the board very dark and I could not see the pencil lines. I finally decided just to go at it, putting in quick lights and darks to define my areas and I was able to finally find the caricature from there. I had a lot of fun with the detailing in the hair, and as I finished, it only seemed appropriate to add a heart, her namesake, above her head.

Mia graciously accepted her painting and it now sits in some office somewhere in Utah, hopefully to make it one day to Washington DC.

 

Western Conservative Summit Review

allen west

 

Western Conservative Summit, was, in a word, pretty dang awesome (okay, so that’s a few words). Just for reference, this past weekend Centennial Institute hosted the fourth annual Western Conservative Summit, a three-day gathering of like-minded conservatives (think CPAC of the West). The house was packed to the gills as we listened to big name guest speakers (like Allen West and Dick Morris) come in and encourage, train, brainstorm, inspire as we work to sway the country for the next few elections.

Most of the speakers were very optimistic about the future of the conservative movement.

Other observations that really stuck out for me:

Despite unfounded accusations to the contrary, the conservative and Republican movement is NOT a racist movement. (Never has been, check the history). This year, much more than last, the summit was an ethnically diverse event. Attendees and speakers were represented by all different races and colors, black, white, Hispanic, Indian, Asian, German, you name it. Not that race is important, as conservatives, it’s all about the content of your character that matters.

The Youth Vote

What WAS still missing was young people. While there was a large student delegation representing CCU, when you removed them, the amount of gray heads in the room was overwhelming. This was an issue that was addressed ad nauseum by many of the speakers. Why are the youth voting Democrat and how do we change this? True, a lot has to do with the liberal brainwashing centers otherwise known as public education, but it’s more than that. Deep down, most young folk are libertarian at heart. Nothing about liberalism is libertarian, except on social issues, and even there, the data is showing that the younger generation is actually MORE prolife than the baby boomers!

The problem is, they are believing the false narrative proclaimed about Republicans and Conservatives by the media, and Republicans do a lousy job at discrediting it. I loved what one student speaker said: Democrats and Liberals show up at college campuses all the time. If Republicans just simply showed up, who knows what kind of difference they could make (and not three months before the election, that comes off as disingenuous.)

And there may be some evidence to this. They shared some polling data from the last election. Overwhelmingly respondents voted Romney as better able to handle everything from the economy to foreign policy. Yet they voted Obama as being more likable and ultimately that’s what guided their vote.

The Third Party

Ted Cruz and several others lambasted the Republican Party for their willingness to cave in to Democrat demands, at the detriment of the country (all for the sake of perceived political gain). A few times the term “Democrat Lite” was used to describe much of today’s Republican leadership and the party in general. If there’s no distinction between Republicans and Democrats on voting day, the public will pick Democrat every single time.

Because of this, a question was posed to Jenny Beth Martin. She was asked if the Republicans continue to look more and more like Democrats, would the TEA Party break off and form a third party. She would not say no.

Use the Force, Luke!

Comic relief was provided by Jonah Goldberg and Bill Whittle. Whittle mentioned that the term “conservative” has a bad connotation for young people, and calling yourself one means instant turnoff. He suggests we change the term to something more appealing, you know, something like “rebel alliance.”

While I laughed out of my seat on that one, it does anger me that our language has to be defined for us. If it has a bad meaning, then we need to be out there changing that meaning. Conservative means freedom, it means liberty, it means charity, it means being allowed to make your own decisions. Whittle also reminded us (and encouraged us to remind our socialist utopian friends) that it’s socialism that has a history of 100 million dead on its hands. History proves that nothing good has ever come from socialism. It goes against basic human nature and requires force to be implemented.

About this illustration

So what does this have to do with the portrait of Allen West you see above, you’ve probably been asking as you’ve slogged through this editorial? I was given the unique privilege and opportunity to create painted caricatures of the speakers. The idea occurred only two weeks before the event, but because of my chalk art gig in Crested Butte the following weekend, I ended up having 7 days to work on this project.

I knew I wanted to develop a new illustration style. I’ve been playing around with a rough and painterly new modern look. I’ve been trying to represent the most amount of information with the largest brush strokes I could. I also start with a textured painted background, which I like to let come in and out of the composition, as I use more opaque paints to bring out the highlights in the foreground.

This new style allowed me to work a little faster than normal. If you do the math, that’s 2 pieces a day. Each piece took an average of 4 hours each. In addition, I still had to keep working on other client obligations. Those 7 straight days I worked roughly 12 hours each and I just cranked out those paintings. I really didn’t have a whole lot of time to think much about the painting. I just had to do it.

Each painting has a story. As I roll out all 14 over the next two weeks, I’ll reveal the story behind each one.

Allen West was the first of this experiment. I decided to add the slight indication of an army camo netting above him as part of the picture.

I then had the opportunity to meet him in person, which was way cool, because I absolutely admire the man. It was a long line, and they were cycling us through fairly quickly, so conversation was out of the question. If you had the chance to say just one thing to one of your heroes, what would you say?

When it was finally my turn I said to him, “Your courage is an inspiration to us all.” Then after the photo, I concluded by saying, “May God continue His blessings upon you.” At that, Mr. West grabbed my hand firmly and looked me straight in the eye and said, “Thank you. That means so much to me. And please, don’t ever forget to pray for me.”

Such is the man, and other events and run-ins with him the next few days solidified just how humble this guy really is. He accepted the above painting with honor, a Benjamin Hummel original, now in the home of former Congressman Allen West.

Healthcare and the Economy

Another illustration for Centennial Review. Two excellent articles written by both an economist and a doctor.

http://www.ccu.edu/centennial/review/oct12/

First, this illustration hit close to home. Many of you know my long and extended medical history. I was born with an agressive auto-immune disease which still sends me to the hospital 2-3 times a year. The past month has been especially trying and there is some talk for additional surgery. So when it came time to needed some artistic “inspiration” for this illustration, I had plenty.

(Not to bore you with personal details, but I have made a cute little video that talks a bit about my story on YouTube. If you want more, go here:

http://youtu.be/9nnCIWCpQ-s)

So many times, Democrats are confounded as to why I would be opposed to Obamacare, or the poorly titled “Health Care Affordability Act.” Wouldn’t it benefit somebody like me the most? I haven’t read the bill, but any law that takes over 2700 pages to write scares the heck out of me. That’s too much legislation and bureaucracy for governmental abuse, not to mention trying to keep track of everything in order to remain compliant.

Yes, the old system was broken. The biggest issue was pre-existing conditions. When you have an entire industry denying a certain group of people their product because of how they were born (as it were in my case), you have a problem. I don’t know how to resolve the issue, honestly. I understand that in the long run, I’m a liability to the company and they have to pay for my care by taking premiums from somebody else’s. Perhaps there is some good with Obamacare in addressing this issue.

Which brings me to the next point. Prices were way too inflated with the old system. Having been in the system all my life, there are a few reasons why this could be.


A) Hospitals treat and then bill and you never know what you are going to get until three months down the road, when you are still recovering and they are demanding payment from some doctor who looked at your chart in another room and sends you a $200 review bill. It’s really aggrevating when you get 15 of them from the same hospital. It’s like free money. Look at the chart, bill the patient, pay for your golf trip. It has happened to me frequently, in some hospitals more than others. I’ve tried calling to contest the bill and this practice, and the receptionist promptly sent me to collections.

You want to reduce costs? Require an upfront cost to the patient or their family and have them sign off before being allowed to proceed with any procedure or treatment (emergencies excepted, of course). Let the patient decide whether they want the doctor from the third floor looking at their chart.

Disclose upfront all of your costs for standard procedures such as bone setting, colonoscopies, xrays, etc. Let the patient then go to the hospital with the best combination of rates and service. This will drive costs down. Competition always does.

B) Cut frivolous and false malpractice lawsuits.  Anybody can file a suit for whatever contrived reason. Often they are settled out of court, even if the doctor is sure of his innocense, just because it’s cheaper than taking it to court and winning! I have an idea. Let whomever brings forth a lawsuit do so knowing that if they lose, they have to pay the doctor’s and hospital’s court and lawyer costs. This will kill the incentive for fake lawsuits. This will lower malpractice insurance dramatically, which the doctor and hospital can then pass on to the patient.


The problem with Obamacare is that neither A nor B can really be found in those 2700 pages. Simple fixes we can implement right away that will start to lower overall costs. Why aren’t they there?

American has the shortest waiting time of any industrialized nation. Those countries that have national health care have wait times that are 5 times or greater. For a country that is as large as ours, imagine how long those wait times will end up being. This could be the difference between life and death for me. I might have to outsource my healthcare overseas, like everything else the government meddles in.

Obamacare also promises rationing. Obama himself even said Granny should take the pain pill once she hits a certain age. For somebody who is a perfect candidate as an individual who should allow natural selection to finally do me in, you can see why I’m not jumping up and down for joy.

Obamacare is now the law of the land. I’m hoping that because we are Americans, that somehow things will be different. Maybe we will still have the greatest healthcare in five years from now. In which case, I hope to still be around to entertain you with my latest cartoons.

Obama Follows FDR Down the Path to Economic Stagnation

This was a fun illustration to do for Centennial Review. I nailed Obama’s likeness. I wish I could say the same for FDR’s, but I was trying to get him to smirk a little, which threw off the illustration a bit. I also had fun recreating the Presidential Desk. Initially, I rendered all the detail on the side of the desk as well, but it ended up making the entire piece cluttered and busy. I went back in and made it all solid black. This helps anchor the piece visually and redirect your attention back to Obama. Yes, I lost all that beautiful pen and ink work, but sometimes ya gotta do it for the integrity of the composition.

The truths of this article are overwhelming. Keynesian policies have proven not to work. How long did Roosevelt preside over a flat, sunken economy? No matter what he tried to do on a federal level, he could not get it to turn around. But he kept getting re-elected, assuring the American people that big o’ daddy government is here to get them through this, and (haven’t heard this one repeated over and over) imagine how bad it would be if we WEREN’T doing anything.

Liberals still see FDR bringing us out of the depression through high taxation and government policies. The robust economy did not finally occur until after WW2, during the 1950s, as a result of Harry Truman, the forgotten Democrat, who lowered tax rates dramatically.

Read more from this excellent article by By Burton Folsom, Jr.

http://www.ccu.edu/centennial/review/sept12/

Presidential Response to Poverty

My goal for this illustration was to try and mimic some of the classic etched illustrations of the Victorian age. My tools were slightly different, relying on my radiographs over traditional etching, but I tried to copy their same line work. I’m very pleased with the result.

HOW AND HOW NOT TO FIGHT POVERTY:LESSONS FROM THE PRESIDENTS
By Lawrence W. Reed

“The lessons of history show conclusively that continued dependence upon relief induces a spiritual and moral disintegration fundamentally destructive to the national fiber. To dole out relief in this way is to administer a narcotic, a subtle destroyer of the human spirit. The federal government must and shall quit this business of relief.”

Surprisingly, these words of an American president do not date from the early years of the Republic, but from the progressive days of the New Deal. Franklin Roosevelt spoke them in 1935. But his pledge of quitting was empty. Indeed, 30 years later Lyndon Johnson would take “this business of relief” to new heights in an official “War on Poverty.”

to read more…

Blind Evolution or Intelligent Design?

WHENCE LIFE:BLIND EVOLUTION OR INTELLIGENT DESIGN?
By Michael J. Behe

Every child born into this world encounters wonders of the most marvelous sort. Early on a toddler will squeal with delight at the sight of a cat, dog, parakeet, horse, or other animal that shares her neighborhood. When she grows older, a trip to the zoo brings astonishment: Animals never seen in the neighborhood, with strange and exotic forms and abilities, are everywhere in the enclosures.

Going off to school the child studies what is arguably the most dazzling of all creatures— humans, who think, talk, accumulate knowledge, and build civilizations.

to read more…

Freedom Cures Poverty

FREEDOM CURES POVERTY WHERE GOVERNMENT FAILS
By Benjamin Powell

Why do some nations become rich while others remain poor? This has been a central question in economics since at least the time of Adam Smith. Today China, India, and Botswana are booming, and in the process lifting hundreds of millions of people out of wretched poverty. Yet most of sub-Saharan Africa not only fails to get rich, but is instead actually getting poorer.

Traditional mainstream economic-growth theory doesn’t help us much to answer the question.Through most of the 20th century it focused on models that assumed growth was a simple function of labor, capital, and technology. The new growth theory looks more to institutions and policy.

to read more…

Depression’s Lessons

AMERICA’S GREAT DEPRESSION: A PREVENTABLE TRAGEDY IN FOUR ACTS
By Lawrence W. Reed

Editor: Amid a recession that some are calling the worst since the 1930s, on the heels of a Democratic presidential victory that recalled 1932 and a Republican congressional comeback echoing 1938, we called on our favorite economic historian to sort out the facts from the myths about that stormy decade. He did not spell out the political parallels between then and now,as there was no need. They speak for themselves.

How bad was the Great Depression? Over the four years from 1929 to 1933, production at the nation’s factories, mines, and utilities fell by more than half. People’s real disposable incomes dropped 28 percent. Stock prices collapsed to one-tenth of the pre-crash height. The number of unemployed Americans rose from 1.6million in 1929 to 12.8 million in 1933.

to read more…

Conservative Comeback

When this article was written, the TEA party was just starting to gain momentum. I do get the sense that even as Europe and France spiral into socialistic chaos, Americans are starting to swing back to conservative values. 

Of course, I loved creating this illustration, simply because of my deep love for baseball. I actually created this drawing while Rockies were playing on television. Nothing like mixing a little play and work together.

ADVANCING THECONSERVATIVE COMEBACK
By Ralph Reed

One of the most significant developments of 2011 is that conservatism, a philosophy many commentators were writing obituaries for not long ago, is making a comeback.

This is a startling turnabout. After Barack Obama’s election, Newsweek proclaimed in a cover story, “We Are All Socialists Now.” “Whether we want to admit it or not,” the editors opined, “the America of 2009 is moving toward a modern European state.” Democrats controlled both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue by wide margins, and a new, youthful president in the model of JohnF. Kennedy, with a background as a community organizer, prepared to usher in a new era of progressive reform. He vowed to repeal the Bush tax cuts, close the prison at Guantanamo Bay, passh ealth care reform and cap-and-trade legislation,and end the war in Iraq.

to read more…

The Guardrails of TABOR

Yes, I know, Douglas Bruce has had a pretty rough time with the law lately. But that doesn’t mean his ideas or what he stands for are somehow wrong or incorrect. The truth is, a government that is accountable to the people is a better government than one that is not, and that’s what TABOR attempts to do.

 

TAX LIMITATION: THE TIME IS NOW
By Douglas Bruce

Editor’s Note: Coloradans were farsighted when they imposed the nation’s toughest tax limitation almost two decades ago. The dangers of unrestrained taxing, spending, and borrowing are dramatized by the fiscal emergencies now unfolding from California to New York to Greece. In a Patriots’ Day lecture for the Centennial Institute on April 19, 2010, the man who designed Colorado’s fiscal restraints talked about the principles involved and the lessons to be learned.

Why should taxes be limited? To protect freedom. Taxation invokes a choice between self-government and collectivist control. The more you can“vote” for goods and services with your own dollars, the more free you are.

to read more … 

Capitalism 101

Capitalism is getting a bad rap these days, and when I hear the complaints against, I realize that so many people are completely ignorant about what capitalism is and what its objectives are. If they would take the time to educate themselves, they would find out that being a believer in capitalism and free markets is actually the morally correct stance to take. The following article is a great article that debunks several of the myths of capitalism.

MORAL FOUNDATIONS OF CAPITALISM
By Paul Prentice

Americans have centuries of experience demonstrating the superiority of free markets over non-free markets in delivering the greatest abundance of goods and services to the greatest number of people. It began with the Pilgrims.

to read more…

Roots of American Liberty

Note to my regular viewers… all five of you. Thank you for being awesome loyal fans. I’m in a crazy time of my life right now, and finding the time to create awesome cartoons that just kick rear end has escaped me. But I want to reward you for your loyalty and give you something fresh to look at. Therefore, for the next several weeks, every Monday morning, I’m going to post an illustration from one of the many articles I’ve illustrated for Centennial Review. I’ll provide the link online, so that you read the full article. Then as I have time, I’ll continue to post additional cartoons, as the political scene in Washington has gone crazy the past couple weeks.

We’ll start with an article written by James Bennett for the April 2010 issue of Centennial Review.

ROOTS OF AMERICAN LIBERTY:OUR DEBT TO THE ANGLOSPHERE
By James C. Bennett

Americans have a strong sense of exceptionalism, seeing themselves as distinct in important ways from the rest of the world. This is not an illusion: It is real. But it exists within a deeper and older exceptionalism of theEnglish-speaking peoples. The U.S.A.owes a grateful debt to that remarkable civilizational heritage which some of us call the Anglosphere.

to read more…

[I loved playing with the perspective on this one.]